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For years, gamers who have been looking to play at the highest resolutions with the most detailed settings in the newest titles have turned towards multi-GPU (mGPU) configurations. With mGPU, gamers are able to pair two compatible graphics cards to work in tandem and significantly boost their performance.

To push performance to its limits, with Radeon Software 17.9.2, gamers are able to use two Radeon™ RX Vega cards in mGPU. This means gamers can pair two Radeon™ RX Vega 56 GPUs or two Radeon™ RX Vega 64 GPUs.

Here’s how performance scales at a glance with Radeon Software 17.9.21:

Upgrade your software to Radeon™ Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.9.2 today and push performance to its limits with two Radeon™ RX Vega’ GPUs.

 

Gurman Singh, Software Marketing Coordinator for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

6 Comments

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  • nVidia

    Nice random numbers
    No settings , no resolution

    • Vlad

      That’s a very good point….

    • othertomperson

      It’s 4K ultra, anti-aliasing disabled (or FXAA or similar light form of AA). I know this because the performance matches GTX 1080 SLI at these settings.

  • nickmavrick

    can’t AMD just name it crossfire 2.0 or crossfire RX, mGPU doesn’t sound like a very good name.

  • Akshat

    What ? Crossfire has be renamed to mGPU now?

  • Guilherme Covolo

    There is no game settings, no PC setup, no resolution, so there is no real results.

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    1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of September 18, 2017 on the 8GB Radeon™ RX Vega 64 in multi-GPU or 8GB Radeon™ RX Vega 64 in single-GPU, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 7700X CPU (4.2 GHz), 16GB DDR4-3000 Mhz system memory, Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.9.2 and Windows 10 x64 at 3940x2160 resolution. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results.
    • Using the game Far Cry Primal on the ultra settings on DirectX®11 scored 41.3 FPS and two 8GB Radeon™ RX Vega 64 in multi-GPU scored 74.3 FPS, which is 80% faster performance.. RS-176
    • Using the game Metro Last Light Redux on the very high settings on DirectX®11 scored 43.3 FPS and two 8GB Radeon™ RX Vega 64 in multi-GPU scored 79.0 FPS, which is 82% faster performance. RS-177
    • Using the game Rise of the Tomb Raider on the very high settings on DirectX®11 scored 45.6 FPS and two 8GB Radeon™ RX Vega 64 in multi-GPU scored 76.8 FPS, which is 69% faster performance. RS-178
    • Using the game Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor on the max settings on DirectX®11 scored 50.3 FPS and two 8GB Radeon™ RX Vega 64 in multi-GPU scored 91.0 FPS, which is 81% faster performance. RS-179
    • Using the game Sniper Elite 4 on the ultra settings on DirectX®12 scored 43.4 FPS and two 8GB Radeon™ RX Vega 64 in multi-GPU scored 82.1 FPS, which is 89% faster performance. RS-180
    • Using the game The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt on the ultra settings on DirectX®11 scored 46.1 FPS and two 8GB Radeon™ RX Vega 64 in multi-GPU scored 82.9 FPS, which is 80% faster performance. RS-181